Thursday, June 22, 2017

It won't stop ---





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                                                           "Think about this-

Its 1862. You are a wife, daughter, son, mother or father of a young Southern man who just grabbed the family musket and volunteered to offer his life in defense of your home. As weeks and months pass, you hear reports from around Richmond of the fighting that's taking place there. You pray every night and without end that God will protect your soldier. As Confederate Infantry Companies were organized by County, every family in your town or community is praying this same prayer.

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But alas, your soldier never returns. The day he left was the last time you saw him, heard his voice, felt his embrace, shook his hand or kissed his cheek. Now, he's gone never to return. He gave his life on the field of battle at Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chickamauga, New Hope Church or God knows where. You don't know the details, you just know he's gone and your life will never be the same as a result. There will always, until the end of your own days, be that void that cannot be filled. For the remainder of your life certain sounds, smells, scenery or other of life's occasions will remind you of him. The tears that come to your eyes when a thought of him crosses your mind may diminish, but they'll never completely go away. Into your old age that last vision of him walking away from your home, rifle in hand, will haunt you.

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This scene played itself out countless thousands of times across our land in the years between 1861 and 1865. Untold numbers of family members suffered this harsh reality as a result of that unnecessary war. They lost everything with the loss of just one loved one. Many families had several of these boys who never returned home. The people who suffered these losses were your family. They were your Grandparents, Aunts and Uncles.

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The monuments erected across the South were in honor of these lost loved ones. They were placed in honor of young boys who fought bravely to defend the exact same principles their forefathers fought for in the war of Independence from Britain. But, they were also constructed to bring a sense of purpose to those left behind. To ease their loss, and to have some amount of pride in what they'd sacrificed. Think of these people, and put yourself in their place, as you witness the disgusting situation that took place in New Orleans now Orlando and more attacks are still coming.

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                                           They said it would stop at the Flag -----

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                    -but the truth is it will stop when our Confederate Ancestors are erased."



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( Post Text Credit DIXIE DIGGER)
*click here*



                                 



Friday, June 2, 2017

For our Korean Veterans ---

It took a few tries to get it right !


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I've been making coins for years, to be left at the graves of Veterans.

I made one that I'm going to place at my Dad's resting place.

If you would like one contact me at Davtatum@aol.com.

Staying Positive !

DT.

( The coins are Not metal but are made out of oven baked clay )

UPDATE
 6/4/17

Today I left a coin for the most important Veteran I Know !

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Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Remembering more Veterans ---

Remembrance coins for our--

Spanish American War Veterans !

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My thanks to Donald Caul for all he does !

Absurdity in a nut shell !


I'm at a loss for words ---

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To hear the most absurd comment you've ever heard go to the 1:15 minute mark in this interview --

Click HERE

"Another form of freedom of speech ?"

YEEEEEESH !

I guess it would be OK to spray paint "JERK" on his Jeep ?

This is the mindset we are faced with !


Sunday, May 21, 2017

Some things ---


Some things I have no control over ---

The Monument situation in New Orleans is one --


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It's a sad and unbefitting ending for the statue of a Great Man.

But there are things I can control -

Honoring our Confederate Veterans, one man at a time --

I'm experimenting with making small plaques --

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Today I stopped by and said "Thank You" to Mr Lassiter --

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I left him a plaque.


D.T.




Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Thanking All --



While placing Remember coins for Confederate Veterans,

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I've noticed a number of Graves of Spanish American War Veterans.
I placed this coin on 5/17/2017

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I figured that All of our Veterans deserve a Thank You, so I've started a new project !

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Thank You / Remembrance Coins for Spanish American War Vets.

Using a medallion provided by Donald Caul / who was instrumental with the start of the project,

I'm working on the coins --

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As time goes on I'm planning on coins for WWI / WWII and other wars.

We've been in many conflicts over the years, once I get done with my present project, I'm gonna try a coin for Korean Vets. My Dad was in WWII and Korea.

Staying positive !

D.T.


Saturday, May 13, 2017

Thank you Sarah !

A few more Thank You / Remembrance coins have been placed --

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Thanks to Sarah and the V V O C.


I've sent a special coin to Illinois for a Confederate Veteran !
I hope to have pictures soon !

Thursday, May 11, 2017

While we're at it ---



Thieves using the cover of darkness.
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Will this be the Replacement in New Orleans ?
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"While the State exists there can be no freedom;
when there is freedom there will be no State."
-- Vladimir Lenin--


What goes around, comes around !
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Tuesday, May 9, 2017

1 -2-3-




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We the Delegates of the People of Virginia
( June 26 1788)

duly elected in pursuance of a recommendation from the General Assembly and now met in Convention having fully and freely investigated and discussed the proceedings of the Federal Convention and being prepared as well as the most mature deliberation hath enabled us to decide thereon Do in the name and in behalf of the People of Virginia declare and make known that the powers granted under the Constitution being derived from the People of the United States may be resumed by them whensoever the same shall be perverted to their injury or oppression and that every power not granted thereby remains with them and at their will: that therefore no right of any denomination can be cancelled abridged restrained or modified by the Congress by the Senate or House of Representatives acting in any Capacity by the President or any Department or Officer of the United States except in those instances in which power is given by the Constitution for those purposes ...

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GOV. LETCHER'S PROCLAMATION.
 HIS REPLY TO SECRETARY CAMERON-STATE OF AFFAIRS AT NORFOLK.
Published: April 22, 1861

The following is the proclamation of Gov. LETCHER, of Virginia:

Whereas, Seven of the States formerly composing a part of the United States have, by authority of their people, solemnly resumed the powers granted by them to the United States, and have framed a Constitution and organized a Government for themselves, to which the people of those States are yielding willing obedience, and have so notified the President of the United States by all the formalities incident to such action, and thereby become to the United States a separate, independent and foreign power; and whereas, the Constitution of the United States has invested Congress with the sole power "to declare war," and until such declaration is made, the President has no authority to call for an extraordinary force to wage offensive war against any foreign Power: and whereas, on the 15th inst., the President of the United States, in plain violation of the Constitution, issued a proclamation calling for a force of seventy-five thousand men, to cause the laws of the United states to be duly executed over a people who are no longer a part of the Union, and in said proclamation threatens to exert this unusual force to compel obedience to his mandates; and whereas, the General Assembly of Virginia, by a majority approaching to entire unanimity, declared at its last session that the State of Virginia would consider such an exertion of force as a virtual declaration of war, to be resisted by all the power at the command of Virginia; and subsequently the Convention now in session, representing the sovereignty of this State, has reaffirmed in substance the same policy, with almost equal unanimity; and whereas, the State of Virginia deeply sympathizes with the Southern States in the wrongs they have suffered, and in the position they have assumed; and having made earnest efforts peaceably to compose the differences which have severed the Union, and having failed in that attempt, through this unwarranted act on the part of the President; and it is believed that the influences which operate to produce this proclamation against the seceded States will be brought to bear upon this commonwealth, if she should exercise her undoubted right to resume the powers granted by her people, and it is due to the honor of Virginia that an improper exercise of force against her people should be repelled. Therefore I, JOHN LETCHER, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, have thought proper to order all armed volunteer regiments or companies within this State forthwith to hold themselves in readiness for immediate orders, and upon the reception of this proclamation to report to the Adjutant-General of the State their organization and numbers, and prepare themselves for efficient service. Such companies as are not armed and equipped will report that fact, that they may be properly supplied.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the Commonwealth to be affixed, this 17th day of April, 1861, and in the eighty-fifth year of the Commonwealth.

JOHN LETCHER.

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Virginia
THE SECESSION ORDINANCE.
AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL THE RATIFICATION OF THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BY THE STATE OF VIRGINIA, AND TO RESUME ALL THE RIGHTS AND POWERS GRANTED UNDER SAID CONSTITUTION.

The people of Virginia, in their ratification of the Constitution of the United States of America, adopted by them in Convention on the twenty-fifth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight, having declared that the powers granted under the said Constitution were derived from the people of the United States, and might be resumed whensoever the same should be perverted to their injury and oppression; and the Federal Government, having perverted said powers, not only to the injury of the people of Virginia, but to the oppression of the Southern Slaveholding States.
Now, therefore, we, the people of Virginia, do declare and ordain that the ordinance adopted by the people of this State in Convention, on the twenty-fifth day of June, eighty-eight, whereby the Constitution of the United States of America was ratified, and all acts of the General Assembly of this State, ratifying or adopting amendments to said Constitution, are hereby repealed and abrogated; that the Union between the State of Virginia and the other States under the Constitution aforesaid, is hereby dissolved, and that the State of Virginia is in the full possession and exercise of all the rights of sovereignty which belong and appertain to a free and independent State. And they do further declare that the said Constitution of the United States of America is no longer binding on any of the citizens of this State.
This ordinance shall take effect and be an act of this day when ratified by a majority of the votes of the people of this State, cast at a poll to be taken thereon on the fourth Thursday in May next, in pursuance of a schedule to be hereafter enacted.
Done in Convention, in the city of Richmond, on the 17th day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, and in the eighty-fifth year of the Commonwealth of Virginia.
JNO. L. EUBANK, Secretary of Convention

Sunday, May 7, 2017

I got caught by a train.

On the way into town to mail a package I got caught by a train.

So I made a side trip --

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Jesse Parker
13th Virginia Cavalry, Company C, Private
Parker is buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery Block B, Lot 14.

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L.A. Stitch
2nd North Carolina, Acting Assistant Surgeon
Stitch was born ca. 1841. He was a doctor and was buried in Cedar
Hill Cemetery Block C, Lot 6.


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Laurence Simmons Baker
1st North Carolina Cavalry, General
General Baker was born May 15, 1830, the son of Dr. John Burgess
and Mary Wynn Gregory Baker of Gates County, N.C. He attended
West Point and was a friend and classmate of General U.S. Grant.
When Grant became president he offered Baker a job in Washington
but Baker did not take it because he felt he was needed by his
men at home. He was a ticket agent for the Seaboard railroad on
North Main Street in Suffolk. Laurence married Elizabeth Earl
Henderson. He died April 10, 1907 and is buried in Cedar Hill
Cemetery, Block V, Lot 11.


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William Robinson Smith
16th Virginia Infantry, Company A, Private
Smith was born March 14, 1843, son of George Robinson and Judith
Elizabeth Kilby Smith. His mother was the only civilian killed
during the war, while fleeing from a burning house under attack,
with her baby in her arms. He moved up in rank while in service
from private to Captain and was captured at Weldon Railroad in
August 1864. Smith was released from Point Lookout, Maryland in
March 1865. He died October 27, 1920 and is buried in Cedar Hill
Cemetery Block C, Lot 10.

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James M. Bailey
16th Virginia Infantry, Company B, 4th Cpl. later 2nd Lieutenant.
Bailey was born in 1839, the son of James and Ann Bailey. He was
wounded at the Crater on July 30 and died of his wounds August 8,
1864.


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Robert Henry Riddick
13th Virginia Cavalry, Company K, Private
Riddick was born ca. 1839. He is buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery,
Block D, Lot 13.

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James E. Jenkins
24th Virginia Cavalry, Secretary to General Dearing
Jenkins was born in 1824. He attended William and Mary College
and became a lawyer. Jenkins died September 15, 1868 and was
given a Masonic funeral at the Methodist Church in Suffolk. He is
buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Block D, Lot 54.

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Jacob Eley Kelly 
13th Virginia Cavalry, Company I, Captain
Kelly was born February 24, 1836, the son of Jacob Holland and
Elizabeth Eley Kelly. He attended the University of Virginia from
1855 to 1856. He married Lucy Edith Ballard Holladay
(b.10-05-1839 d.02-21-1882) on January 12, 1859.. His second wife
was Hattie B. Rives (b. 06-10-1908), whom he married on Sept. 10,
1884. Kelly was a merchant. Jacob Kelly died January 13, 1888.

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Ezekiel Powell Kelly
13th Virginia Cavalry, Company I, Private
Kelly was born in 1839, the son of Jacob Holland and Susan Powell
Kelly. His first wife was Mary C. Flynn (1838- ), his second wife
was Mary Connally Williamson (1849- ). Kelly is buried in Cedar
Hill Cemetery, Block D, Lot 33. There are no dates on his stone.

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Owen Flynn Duke
16th Virginia Infantry, Company A, Private
Duke was born December 6, 1845 in Suffolk, the son of David O.
and Catherine Flynn Duke. He attended VMI before the war. He died
May 8, 1891 and is buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery