Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Emotionionalism!



Emotionalism! After reading a recent post by Kevin Levin I have come to understand why there is such a great divide in the way in which he and I differ in our view of the WBTS.


Kevin has no heart in the matter; he views it in a purely logical aspect, kind of like Mr. Spock on Star Trek . He simply looks at statistics and reports and then gives an opinion, (anti-southern) I often notice him refer to books written by other “historians and researchers” but then isn’t he relying on their interpretation? Then depending upon his agreement with their views he either promotes’ or disregards their efforts.


I like to look into the hearts of the men who fought in the battles. I think Kevin called my type of view “Emotionalism” or something close to that. And he is correct, I do have a lot of emotion regarding my southern heritage, and seeing as how he claims no ancestry to the south how can I expect him to understand? But there is something to be said for emotionalism!


In the days following 9/11 was it a logical assimilation of facts that drew the American people together, or was it emotion?


If you have ever seen the photograph of the fireman carrying the lifeless baby from the destruction of the Oklahoma City Bombing, is it logic or emotion you view the picture with?


When a 21 gun salute is fired for a fallen soldier from our present war on terror; is it logic that brings tears to the family’s eyes or emotion? And that very same fallen soldier who gave his life by covering a grenade with his own body to save his comrades, again is it logic or emotion? I thing courage and self sacrifice are emotions!


The Confederate Heart / the following text is by---- CARLTON McCARTHY PRIVATE SECOND COMPANY RICHMOND HOWITZERS.

I guess it describes the Confederate soldier as well as anything I have seen.


The heart is greater than the mind. No man can exactly define the cause for which the Confederate soldier fought. He was above human reason and above human law, secure in his own rectitude of purpose, accountable to God only, having assumed for himself a nationality which he was minded to defend with his life and his property, and there to pledged his sacred honor. In the honesty and simplicity of his heart, the Confederate soldier had neglected his own interests and rights, until his accumulated wrongs and indignities forced him to one grand, prolonged effort to free himself from the pain of them. He dared not refuse to hear the call to arms, so plain was the duty and so urgent the call. His brethren and friends were answering the bugle-call and the roll of the drum. To stay was dishonor and shame”!


Also a letter from my ancestor, William Henry Tatum, Private First company Richmond Howitzers; that reads in part ---

When I volunteered I really did not know how long of a time it was for, and in fact I did not care. I am , with the other 12 month volunteers, called upon to reenlist in accordance with an act of congress of Dec 11th 1861 and I am called on to decide what I should do, before we are mustered out of service. I think that with everybody else , that the period will be the most critical one in our history, our enemy are perfectly aware of the straight in which we are placed and will certainly endeavor to take advantage of it. Now what is my duty, to go home and leave our defense to an undisciplined militia who will make a sorry fight at best, leaving it in the range of probability that the northern hessians will overrun our state before the summer is over and thereby bring ruin on us all? Or stay in the field, determined to see the end of this business before we give it up. I might say to myself I am only one, I will not be missed, but ought we to allow such selfish considerations to govern us, our whole army is made up of individuals, and suppose each was to say the same thing”?


Yes William puts feelings into his letters, writing from his heart about a place that he loves: Virginia! A place that our family has lived since 1619. I can’t expect Kevin to understand. I guess he would consider me akin to a medieval surf, I have lived my entire life within a 30 mile radius. On the very edge of the Great Dismal Swamp, no place I’d rather live. I have traveled a bit but was always ready to get Home!


Kevin, You can crunch numbers and statistics, you can look at every book in every library on earth and you can continue to turn out a cold “Vulcan” opinions. Maybe one day you will understand the concept of home, why it’s worth defending. Not only now but back in 1861 when Lincolns’ men invaded.


I will continue to look at the stories and letters written by the men who were in the war. And when I hear Taps played at a Marker dedication for a Confederate soldier or played for a fallen soldier from Afghanistan I will allow my heart to feel sadness. I will pray for the souls of both soldiers, and the family’s of the same. So count your numbers, dot your I’s and cross your T’s. I will continue to sing Dixie from my heart, and thank God that I’m who I am. And also thank God that my ancestors were who they were and did what they did.


David Tatum Jr.

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Newport News Murders


The Newport News Murders.

I'm looking into some unsolved murders of Confederates' at the Newport News Prison camp. The following account shows a pattern of abuse.


This is an account of a shooting on April 20th.April 1865 Newport News VA....


Inconsistent Testimony


Testimony of Private John Gains, Company D, One hundred and twenty-second U. S. Colored Troops:

“I was posted as a sentinel on post No. 47 of the prison camp on the night of the 20th of April, 1865. I received orders to halt all persons approaching my post. While on post I saw a prisoner running toward post. There were ten or fifteen other prisoners close behind him. I ordered him to halt. He did not do so, but turned away from me. I them shot at him. I feel certain that the man I shot at was trying to escape.”( if the prisoner had turned away from the guard at gate 47 how could he be trying to escape?)


Testimony of Private Jack Eubanks, Company D, One hundred and twenty-second Regiment U. S. Colored Troops:

Was on post in the prison camp on the night of the 20th of April, 1865. During the night several of the prisoners approached my post as if trying to escape. I halted them and ordered them back to camp. I saw a man run from post No. 47 and I saw three or four more men behind him. They also ran. I saw John Gains fire his gun. I also fired my gun; don't know whether I shot any person or not. I took aim at the crowd. I received orders from the officer of the guard to halt all persons approaching my post, and if they did not halt when ordered, to shoot at them


(OK the number of prisoners has gone from 10 or 15 to 3 or 4, in both cases turning away from gate 47 and in this testimony running AWAY)


Testimony of Private Lewis Burris, Company D, One Hundred and twenty-second Regiment U. S. Colored Troops:

“I was on post No. 48 in the prison camp on the night of the 20th of April, 1865. I received orders from the officer of the guard to hail all persons approaching my post and to halt them within ten paces, and if they did not halt, to shoot them. During the time I was on post the prisoners kept coming close up to post No. 47, where John Gains was posted. I told them to keep away; that I did not want to hurt them. I saw a man running toward John Gains' post and there were at least five or six behind him running also; heard John Gains order him to halt several times. He did not halt, but kept approaching his post. I then saw Gains shoot at him. I then shot at him, but before shooting ordered him to halt; he did not do so. I did not hear him say anything before he was shot. I think that the man that was shot was trying to escape”


( OK now we have prisoners running towards gate 47)


Captain A. D. Clark, of Company D, One hundred and twenty-second Regiment U. S. Colored Troops:

I was officer of the day and was passing through the prison camp in company with the officer of the guard on the night of the 20th of April, 1865; heard the sentinel on post No. 47 hail in the following manner: "Halt! You had better halt! God damn you halt!" In about ten seconds heard three shots fired in rapid succession. I then took a relief around to the sentinels on posts Nos.46,47, and 48; was informed by the sentinels that they had shot at a prisoners and that he had gone in the direction of the camp. I then returned with the relief and went to where I heard the wounded man was, sent for the surgeon, and had the wounded prisoner removed to the hospital. A short time previous to the shooting of the prisoner I heard a shot fired. I went to learn the cause; found it to have been fired by the sentinel on post 47; found the sentinel reloading his piece and two prisoners standing within eight or ten feet of him. I asked the prisoners what they were doing there; received no reply. I then ordered them to go away from there. They did not obey until I drew my saber on them and compelled them to do so.


( Now we have prisoners standing near the gate where a man was just shot, and a guard with an empty gun, seems like if you were gonna rush the gate, when the guards gun was empty would be the time don’t you think? The of the guards stated that the men had turned away/ ran away/ and one says were running at the gate. Now the Capt. Says men were standing at the gate! I ain’t Perry Mason, but something just don’t add up. Lets see what the man who got shot says---


Testimony of Prisoner of War Thomas M. Tyree, private, Company D, Nineteenth Battalion Virginia Heavy Artillery:

“On the night of the 20th of April, 1865, I was going to the sink, when the sentinel hailed me several times and ordered me to halt. I did not know at first that he was hailing me. I halted when ordered. The sentinel told me to come up to him. I did so, and when within fifteen paces of him he ordered me to halt again. I halted. He then asked me what I wanted. I told him that I had the diarrhea and was going to do a job. The sentinel said it was a damned lie; that I did not want to shit. He then shot me. I was also shot by the sentinel on each side


And we also have the diary from another prisoner--- Creed T Davis

April 18.—Still sick. Most of the prisoners are prostrated with dysentery and other bowel complaints—thought to be the results of the **bad water we are forced to use in this low country. Our water is obtained from barrels sunk in the low places of the surface of the ground inside the prison enclosure


April 21.—Our prison life grows more and more wearisome ; it is almost unbearable. Every hour seems an age, and I am in despair of ever getting out again. The negro guards of the prison become more insolent and domineering every day. They abuse us in an infamous manner. Several prisoners have been shot down for the most trivial offences, without even a warning. Two men were shot last night.

( Ok Pvt. Deeds C.S.A. says two men were shot, the yanks say one, Private Jack Eubanks of USCT admits to firing into the crowd and is not sure if he hit anyone It seems that the Confederates’ story adds up, bad water dysentery and other bowel complaints = diarrhea !


The arrogance of the guards also seems to match between Deeds’ and Tyree)**


However the Yankee inspector paints a different storyAbout conditions at the camp.


Colonel J. HAM DAVIDSON, Commanding Post, Newport News, Va.


SIR: I have the honor to submit the following inspection report of the condition of the prisoners of war at this station for the week ending April 22, 1865:Conduct-good. Cleanliness-good. Clothing-good. Bedding-sufficient. State of quarters-good. State of mess-houses-none state of kitchen-good. Food, quality of-good. Food, quantity of-issued per General Orders, No. 1, Office of Commissary-General of Prisoners. Water-good. Sinks-temporary ones in use, permanent ones in preparation. Police of grounds-good. Drainage-good. Police of hospital-hospital not finished. Attendance of sick-average 140 each day. Hospital diet-none issued as such. General health of prisoners-good. Vigilance of guard-goodRemarks and suggestions.-The ground enclosed comprises twenty-five acres, enclosed by a fence twelve feet high, inside of which is a railing twenty feet from the fence, which prisoners are not allowed to pass. Outside of the fence a gallery has been erected for the sentinels, from which they can observe who approaches the railing and also any unusual disturbance among the prisoners. The hospital is now building and will be finished in a few days. Wells have been sunk, which will give a full supply of water. It will not be necessary to erect mess-houses. A detail is made each morning from the prisoners for the purpose of policing the grounds. Personal cleanliness is very good, with but few exceptions. The present sinks are but temporary. In two or three days sinks of a permanent character will be in use.Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, JOHN HAROLD, Second Lieutenant, 122nd U. S. Colored Troops, and Insp. Officer

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Copyright Infringment?



A while back Kevin Levin and Robert Moore were poking fun at one of Mort Kunstler’s paintings, Kevin’s Blog title was “I think I’ve seen this painting before”
http://cwmemory.com/2009/09/11/i-think-ive-seen-this-painting-before/

Moore had a similar post at the same time! I can’t find it right now But to my surprise this gem by Robert Moore is still posted!
http://cenantua.wordpress.com/2008/11/12/some-thoughts-on-civil-war-art/
I cant show the web page or I will commit the same infringement


Now then, at Kunstler’s web site it clearly states that he allows no reproductions of his work.

“ All illustrations by Mort K√ľnstler. Text by Dee Brown, Henry Steele Commager, Rod Gragg, Mort K√ľnstler, James McPherson, and James I. Robertson, Jr. - *Copyright © 2001-2009”

(* The legal right of creative artist or publishers to control the use of their original works)

Yet Kevin and Bobby chose to ignore this legality. Bobby tried to circumvent the issue by putting up a disclaimer that said “For educational purposes only”
After numerous messages from me the paintings were taken down and links provided.
If I remember correctly this is when I got banned from Kevin’s blog.
So by ignoring a plainly posted copyright statement and posting the painting were Kevin and Bobby doing the right thing? Is copyright infringement a crime?

Can Robert Moore show me a waiver from Kunstler that gives him permission to use the art work he has posted?

Let me close by saying “ *Let he who is without sin cast the first stone”
Oh wait a minute do I need to list the Author, so that I am not guilty of Plagiarism?


Dave Tatum
* Jesus

Saturday, March 19, 2011

Newport News Murders II


A REPORT ON THE CONDITION OF THE CAMP & WORTHINESS TO SUPPORT POW'S

Colonel J. HAM DAVIDSON,
Commanding Post, Newport News, Va.:
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following inspection report of the condition of the prisoners of war at this station for the week ending April 22, 1865:
Conduct-good. Cleanliness-good. Clothing-good. Bedding-sufficient. State of quarters-good. State of mess-houses-none state of kitchen-good. Food, quality of-good. Food, quantity of-issued per General Orders, No. 1, Office of Commissary-General of Prisoners. Water-good. Sinks-temporary ones in use, permanent ones in preparation. Police of grounds-good. Drainage-good. Police of hospital-hospital not finished. Attendance of sick-average 140 each day. Hospital diet-none issued as such. General health of prisoners-good. Vigilance of guard-good
( If shooting and stabbing Confederate prisinors is considered good this is correct)
Remarks and suggestions.-The ground enclosed comprises twenty-five acres, enclosed by a fence twelve feet high, inside of which is a railing twenty feet from the fence, which prisoners are not allowed to pass. Outside of the fence a gallery has been erected for the sentinels, from which they can observe who approaches the railing and also any unusual disturbance among the prisoners. The hospital is now building and will be finished in a few days. Wells have been sunk, which will give a full supply of water.*
It will not be necessary to erect mess-houses. A detail is made each morning from the prisoners for the purpose of policing the grounds. Personal cleanliness is very good, with but few exceptions. The present sinks are but temporary. In two or three days sinks of a permanent character will be in use.
Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, JOHNHAROLD, Second Lieutenant, 122nd U. S. Colored Troops, and Insp. Officer.



Confederate View of the same Camp !

Richmond Howitzer Battalion.
April 18.—Still sick. Most of the prisoners are prostrated with dysentery and other bowel complaints—thought to be the results of the bad water we are forced to use in this low country. Our water is obtained from barrels sunk in the low places of the surface of the ground inside the prison enclosure. Have just read an account of the assassination of President Lincoln, which took place at a theatre in Washington City. This sad occurrence will no doubt rebound to our great disadvantage. Prisoners now consider the war at an end, and most of them are ready to swallow the oath of allegiance to the government of the United States.


(*Anyone who knows the Hampton roads area knows that a barrel sunk at ground level does not provide good water. Who do you believe?)

April 21.—Our prison life grows more and more wearisome ; it is almost unbearable. Every hour seems an age, and I am in despair of ever getting out again. The negro guards of the prison become more insolent and domineering every day. They abuse us in an infamous manner. Several prisoners have been shot down for the most trivial offences, without even a warning. Two men were shot last night. Rumors to-day of a release soon, but we dare not trust ourselves to believe them, we have been so often disappointed. Our rations are codfish and hard navy crackers—a poor bill of fare for a man with bad teeth, like I happen to have. Out of heart to-day, and indescribably miserable.

Friday, March 18, 2011

Soldier to Soldier

Learning that the army had gone into camp, the skirmishers went on in the direction of the village, and found the battalion in the woods near the main road. Fires were burning, and those who had been fortunate enough to find anything eatable were cooking. Federal troops were riding up and down the road and loafing about the camps trying to be familiar. They seemed to think that How are you, “Johnny “? Spoken in condescending style, was sufficient introduction.

During the day a line of men came single file over the hill near the camp, each bearing on his shoulder a box of “ hard-tack or crackers”. Behind these came a beef, driven by soldiers. The crackers and beef were a present from the Federal troops near, who, knowing the famishing condition of the surrounded army, had contributed their day s rations for its relief. All honor to them. It was a soldierly act which was thoroughly appreciated.

The beef was immediately shot and butchered, and before the animal heat had left the meat, it was impaled in little strips on sticks, bayonets, swords, and pocket-knives, and roasting over the fires.Though numbers of the enemy visited the camps and plied the men with all sorts of questions, seeming very curious and inquisitive, not an unkind word was said on either side that day.

When the skirmishers under McRaeen, entered the camp of the battalion, their enthusiastic descriptions of driving the enemy and being driven in turn failed to produce any effect. Many of the men were sobbing and crying, like children recovering from convulsions of grief after a severe whipping. They were sorely grieved, mortified, and humiliated. Of course they had not the slightest conception of the numbers of the enemy who surrounded them.Other men fairly raved with indignation, and declared their desire to escape or die in the attempt ; but not a man was heard to blame General Lee. On the contrary, all expressed the greatest sympathy for him and declared their willingness to submit at once, or fight to the last man, as he ordered. At no period of the war was he held in higher veneration or regarded with more sincere affection, than on that sad and tearful day.

(by Carlon McCarthy 2nd Co Richmond Howitzers)

Love for his Son and Faith in God.


I'm still digging into the Newport News Murders, I hope to have more info soon.


In the meanwhile, a true account from a guy who was in the WBTS.


The Parson who led the charge at Brook Church.
By Carlton McCarthy, 2nd Co. Richmond Howitzers


The day General Stuart fell, mortally wounded, there was a severe fight in the woods not far from the old Brook Church, a few miles from Richmond ; the enemy was making a determined stand, in order to gain time to repair a bridge which they were compelled to use, and the Confederate infantry skirmishers were pushing them hard. The fighting was stubborn and the casualties on the Confederate side very numerous. In the midst of the fight a voice was heard shouting, “Where's my boy? I m looking for my boy”! Soon the owner of the voice appeared, tall, slim, aged, with silver gray hair, dressed in a full suit of broadcloth. A tall silk hat and a clerical collar and cravat completed his attire. His voice, familiar to the people of Virginia, was deep and powerful. As he continued to shout, the men replied, “Go back, old gentleman ; you'll get hurt here. Go back ; go back” !
No, no ; said he, I can go any where my boy has to go, and the Lord is here. I want to see my boy, and I will see him” ! Then the order, “Forward” ! was given and the men made once more for the enemy. The old gentleman, his beaver in one hand, a big stick in the other, his long hair flying, shouting, ; “Come on, boys” ! he disappeared in the depths of the woods, well in front. He was a Methodist minister, an old member of the Virginia Conference, but his carriage that day was soldierly and grand. One thought that his boy was there made the old man feel that he might brave the danger, too. No man who saw him there will ever forget the parson who led the charge at Brook Church.

Thursday, March 17, 2011



Murder in Newport News !

A number of Murders have occurred in Newport News Virginia that are unsolved and to this point uninvestigated.

As I understand Virginia law felonies do not have a statute of limitations.

So as an extreme “Cold Case” the following information needs to be checked into. All Men and Women have certain rights that are forever granted and time has no restraints to the guarantee of these rights.

April 20th 1865 / A Negro sentinel shot a prisoner this morning. The negro claims that it was accidental. Of course it was. Every time a man has been shot this has been the excuse.

A report from May 8th 1865 / The negro guard last night bayoneted a prisoner without the slightest provocation, killing him upon the spot,
(May 7th night before)
Prison records indicate 2 men died on that date!
John H. Whitman, private. Fifty-seventh North Carolina, Company
K ; died May 7th; buried at P. West's farm.

B. Beckman, private, First South Carolina, Company F; died
May 7th; buried at P. West's farm.

Report From / Diary of Creed T. Davis. Richmond Howitzers

Why were these men in prison? They were captured Confederate soldiers.
What was their crime? Fighting for independence, NOT fighting to overthrow the existing government!

So it’s March 2011, There are still billions of gallons of oil someplace in the Gulf Coast, Global Warming is melting Greenland and the seas are rising, and the tragedy in Japan has Global implications. None of which I can change.

But I can investigate the Newport News Murders, and maybe name a killer, and find a small measure of justice for a man.
___________________UPDATE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!_____________________
Persons of Interest !
Private John Gains, Company D, One hundred and twenty-second U. S. Colored Troops
Private Jack Eubanks, Company D, One hundred and twenty-second Regiment U. S. Colored Troops
Private Lewis Burris, Company D, One Hundred and twenty-second Regiment U. S. Colored Troops:
Second Lieutenant George B. Everett, Company A, Second U. S. Colored Cavalry:
=================================================================
Please note /
"This is not a "Black Witch Hunt" The evidence indicates that SOME of the killers were members of the USCT.
I don't care what color they were, I consider them all the same = Yankees !

Wednesday, March 16, 2011


The Confederate soldier was purely patriotic. He foresaw clearly, and deliberately chose, the trials which he endured. He was an individual who could not become the indefinite portion of a mass, but fought for himself, on his own account. He was a self-sacrificing hero, but did not claim that distinction or any merit, feeling only that he was in the line of duty to self, country, and God. He fought for a principle, and needed neither driving nor urging, but was eager and determined to fight. He was not a politic man, but a man under fervent feeling, forgetful of the possibilities and calamities of war, pressing his claims to the rights of humanity.The Confederate soldier was a monomaniac for four years. His mania was, the independence of the Confederate States of America, secured by force of arms. The Confederate soldier was a venerable old man, a youth, a child, a preacher, a farmer, merchant, student, statesman, orator, father, brother, husband, son, the wonder of the world, the terror of his foes !

By

CARLTON MCCARTHY PRIVATE SECOND COMPANY RICHMOND HOWITZERS

Monday, March 14, 2011

The Best Folks on Earth !






This is a dedicated group of folks who deal with the Truth !





http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=117575144924371

Neo Abolitionist !

Neo Abolisitionist !

I love it !

http://georgiaheritagecouncil.org/site2/commentary/vallante-black-history-month1.phtml

Black Confederates !

Black Confederates

With all of the Hoo Ha over the existence of Black Confederates being fact
or myth it seems pretty apparent that they existed, their status is the subject
of the Neo-Yankees. Were they documented? Did they carry a gun?
Were they slaves? Did they serve willingly? Did they draw a pension?
The list of questions as to their status goes on and on.

The advantage of a blog site is you can pretty much say what ya want to.
So I’m gonna take advantage of that !
“I don’t care if the Black Men who served the Confederacy were brought
down in space ships from Mars (surely the conditions were better than the ones in the Yankee slave ships) they were there, and it don’t make a Rats Bottom if they were cooks, musicians, teamsters, laborers or sharpshooters,
If they stood beside their white, and Native American counterparts during the war they were Black Confederates.

Why is that so hard for “some” folks to grasp?

I don’t care if you got 3 PhD’s from Harvard, a BS from Princeton, and a BA from Eureka (Hell you might as well throw in a Blue Ribbon from the FFA for the biggest Bull) Black Men fought for the Confederacy to stop the invading Yankee forces and protect their homes.
It’s the Truth so “Get Over It”

DT.

From the Front !


Fredericksburg
Dec 12th 1862


Dear John.

Sergeant McCreery, chief of my piece, goes down tomorrow and I send this by him. Enclosed_______________ Thirty______________ which I wish you to hand to Ma and return my sincere thanks.

You will get this Friday, if you can go down home and get me two pair of drawers and leave with VanLew and Taylor Saturday directed plainly I will be much obliged. Now I would not put you to this trouble if I could do better but I am now almost without and cannot get there. I want a box sent as soon as we go into winter quarters with my gray coat pants shoes and with all the good things to eat you have to spare.

The last letter I got was one from Pa which was a very interesting one, dated 16th Nov. I have written several times, the last was to Louisa enclosing $20. Please write by McCeery and say if the money is received. In writing direct plainly,

W.H. Tatum
Howitzer Co.
Gen’l Barksdales Brigade
McLaws Division
Fredericksburg

Everything is quiet about here, there has been no fighting lately, it snowed last Friday and has not thawed since until today, the snow is still on the ground. I suppose the people in the neighborhood of Richmond are taking advantage of this opportunity and are getting ice. The Rappahannock is frozen across.

Tell Pa I think he deserves all praise for prevailing on the Engineers to change their base, it would have indeed ruined the little farm and then Mr. Randolph can stand the loss so much better than we can.

Our Boys are getting Christmas in their bones already and are talking about having one big dinner, I do not know where we will be then. We have just been paid off to the 1st Nov. and the bounty, but clothing and borrowed money takes mighty nearly all of it.
I want you to get me two quires good paper and a package of good envelopes and put iy by for me, with a bottle of ink and write me what it cost.

Remember me with love to all
William

Sunday, March 13, 2011




A Useful Discovery /

By William M Dame


BATTLES OF SPOTTSYLVANIA COURT HOUSE...





In this fight, necessity, the mother of invention, put us up to a device that served us well here, and that we made fullest use of, in every fight we had afterwards. When we had kept up that rapid fire, with a scant gun detachment, in plowed ground, and under a hot sun, for an hour, we were nearly exhausted. After Hardy was wounded, and left us, it was still worse. The hardest labor, and what took most time, was running up the guns from the recoil. We had stopped a moment to rest, and let the gun cool a little, and were discussing the difficulties, when the idea occurred to us. There was an old rail fence near by. Somebody said “let’s get some rails and chock the wheels to keep them from running back.” This struck us all as good, and in an instant we had piled up rails behind the wheels as high as the trail would allow. The effect was, that when the gun fired it simply jerked back against this rail pile, and rested in its place, and so we were saved all the time and labor of running up. We found that we could fire three or four times as rapidly, in this way. So that a chocked gun was equal to four in a fight. We found this simple device of immense service! We were told by the knowing ones that we ran the greatest possible danger. The ordnance people said that if a gun was not allowed to recoil it would certainly burst. But we didn’t mind! A device that saved so much labor, and enabled us to deliver such an extraordinarily effective fire on the battlefield, we were bound to try. We found it acted beautifully. We then knew the guns wouldn’t burst for we had tried it.We used it afterward in every fight. The instant we were ordered into position, two or three cannoneers would rush off and get rails, or a log or two, to chock the guns. And on two or three very desperate emergencies, during this campaign, this device enabled us to render very important service. It made a battery equal to a battalion, and a good many other batteries took it up, and used it. I believe it added greatly to the effectiveness of our artillery in the close-range fighting of this campaign.Well! even with this relief, the labor of working our guns in this furious and prolonged fight was fearful! At last the welcome order, “Section cease firing” was given. We limbered up, and drew the guns a short distance to the side, out of the line of fire, and utterly exhausted, we cannoneers, threw ourselves right down on the plowed ground beside the guns, and slept like the dead

Monument to a warrior

Suffolk man’s yard art has some neighbors seeing only red

BY LINDA McNATT THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT

• Reach Linda McNatt at (757) 222-5561 or linda.mcnatt@pilot online.com.
SUFFOLK — When Dave Tatum gazes across his front lawn, near the edge of the narrow, rural road he lives on, he sees a monument to a man he considers a hero.

When his neighbors look at the same scene, they see a “huge structure with a cannon on top.”

That’s what a neighbor told city officials, when calling to report Tatum for building without a permit.

When the inspector visited last week, according to Tatum’s wife, Fran, the woman smiled and called it a “garden structure, with yard art.” No permit required.

Tatum said he’d been thinking about the memorial to his great-grandfather, John Calhoun Tatum, for a while. When steel bars started coming into the construction job site where he works in Virginia Beach as a safety director, an idea popped into his head. The timbers supporting the bars would have been thrown away.

Now Tatum has constructed a wooden pyramid – shaped to resemble the Confederate monument at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond – at the front of his home on the edge of the Dismal Swamp.

It does have a cannon on it. And a little soldier dressed in gray.

“It ain’t coming down,” Tatum said. “People come by and wave. I’ve gotten a couple of eee-hah’s. This really means something to me.”

Tatum recently learned that his greatgrandfather was a private in the Richmond Howitzers, an elite group of volunteers formed just before the Civil War.

Soon after Virginia seceded, the Howitzers, numbering about 300, were mustered in. They served in major battles and were there when Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox.

William Henry Tatum, a Richmond merchant, joined first, his descendant learned. Later, a little more than a year before the end of the Civil War, John Tatum, barely 18, joined.

Tatum learned more about his grandfather through letters written home by the older brother. William told his parents how John taught others in the unit that last winter of the war, when the South was short on things such as manpower and ammunition, how to trap birds for food.

And, Tatum said, when the Union forces hurled cannonballs , John would dig them up for recycling. William told the family he didn’t know what he was going to do with his younger brother.

William, his great uncle, is buried in Hollywood Cemetery, said Tatum. He hasn’t found his grandfather’s grave. Meanwhile, he has a memorial to John Calhoun in his yard.

“The inspector gave me a piece of paper saying I don’t need a permit,” he said.

The soldier is made of concrete. The cannon is concrete, too.

“My wife wouldn’t let me get a real cannon,” Tatum said, grinning.
A Duel of Honor !
(Boys will be Boys)

During the war a matter of Honor prompted a duel between two of the Richmond Howitzers.
While camped in Spottsylvania county, Mr William G Lampkin who was considered a lady Charmer .and Mr TJ Macon would soon face off in a duel to the death.
Near the Poison Fields was the residence of Count Deaskie, and family. His family consisted of himself his wife and three daughters. Mr Lampkin being the lady charmer made himself a frequent visitor.
TJ Macon, Ben Lambert and Edward Barnes Decided to play a joke on William. The three young men went to the home while William was visiting. Mr Barnes during the course of the evening sand a song with a fine tenor voice which the Count had him repeat. They spent a fine evening.
Upon return to camp, Macon sent word to Lampkin that he felt he had been treated shabbily and expected satisfaction. A duel was arranged !
J B Lambert was Macon’s second and Barnes was second to Lampkin. The duel and location were agreed upon. The agreement stated that a maximum of three rounds would be used at 50 yards distance.
The duel went on as planned and went as far as the third shot ! On the 3rd shot Macon fell with blood showing over his heart. He was placed upon a litter mortally wounded and taken to camp.
As he lay in the tent life fading away he was paid a visit by the victor.
“How are you Tom” ? asked William. “Very well under the circumstances I thank you, and How are you?”
At this point William knew he had been taken, The guns contained only powder no shot and the blood came from a sponge placed under TJ’s shirt and an unwilling horse.
This duel must have kept the camp laughing for days !
I got the story from chapter X of the book Reminiscences of the First Company Richmond Howitzers by T.J. Macon
True Southern Treasure©
Tall tales and long stories are still around.
Of Great Southern treasures - Buried deep in the ground.
Tales of Bright silver and boxes of gold.
from the Yankees , so no one was told.
No maps were made, because they might be found!
But TRUE southern treasure is not underground!
I’ve found the treasure - I share it with you!
As soon as you hear - you will know it is true
!So please listen careful - for now I shall tell!
It’s not Gold or silver, It’s our sweet Southern Belles’
For the Greatest of treasures in all of the land
Can’t match the soft touch - of a southern Belles hand.
Name all of the things that money can buy!
None are as lovely as a Southern Belles eyes.
Please think of something- go on take a while.
Name one thing as precisions - as a Southern Belles smile.
For our most valued treasure- we should thank God above.
For the greatest treasure of all - Is that Southern Belles LOVE!

David Tatum Jr. ®